News

2017/02/01
Meet LLTech at Agora Biotech investment event – February 22nd
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2017/01/28
LLTech at Photonics West 2017 – San Francisco 28 January – 2 February 2017
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2016/11/18
Real-time analysis of colorectal polyps during coloscopy
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2016/10/14
New publication on FFOCT imaging of humanized orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma in immunodeficient mice
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2016/10/13
Meet LLTech at JFR 2016 – Paris 14-17 October 2016
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2017/02/01
Meet LLTech at Agora Biotech investment event – February 22nd

The LLTech team and advisors will be present on February 22nd for the Agora Biotech Funding event.

The team will showcase the product, present the company and the investment opportunity.

For further information and request an invitation please register at www.biotech-agora.com

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Biotech Agora a pour vocation de faire découvrir aux investisseurs des sociétés dans le domaine des Biotechs et des Sciences de la Vie qui offrent des innovations de rupture. 

Biotech Agora met en lumière des sociétés de pointe, cotées et non cotées, et contribue au financement de l’innovation en favorisant les rencontres entre dirigeants et investisseurs.

2016/11/18
Real-time analysis of colorectal polyps during coloscopy

The LLTech device was used this week under real coloscopy conditions at Cochin Hospital, Paris. Excised polyps were imaged within minutes by FFOCT in the coloscopy room, and the images transmitted to the pathologist office through the hospital network. The pathologist could thus give a feedback to the endoscopist during the coloscopy on the malignancy of the polyp.

Note: this experiment was conducted under a research study, which did not alter the patient management. 

 

2016/10/14
New publication on FFOCT imaging of humanized orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma in immunodeficient mice

Multimodal imaging of a humanized orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma in immunodeficient mice

Wu T, Heuillard E, Lindner V, et al. Multimodal imaging of a humanized orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma in immunodeficient mice. Scientific Reports. 2016;6:35230. doi:10.1038/srep35230.

Abstract

The development of multimodal strategies for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma requires tractable animal models allowing for advanced in vivo imaging. Here, we characterize an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model based on the injection of luciferase-expressing human hepatoma Huh-7 (Huh-7-Luc) cells in immunodeficient mice. Luciferase allows for an easy repeated monitoring of tumor growth by in vivo bioluminescence. The intrahepatic injection was more efficient than intrasplenic or intraportal injection in terms of survival, rate of orthotopic engraftment, and easiness. A positive correlation between luciferase activity and tumor size, evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, allowed to define the endpoint value for animal experimentation with this model. Response to standard of care, sorafenib or doxorubicin, were similar to those previously reported in the literature, with however a strong toxicity of doxorubicin. Tumor vascularization was visible by histology seven days after Huh-7-Luc transplantation and robustly developed at day 14 and day 21. The model was used to explore different imaging modalities, including microtomography, probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, full-field optical coherence tomography, and ultrasound imaging. Tumor engraftment was similar after echo-guided intrahepatic injection as after laparotomy. Collectively, this orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model enables the in vivo evaluation of chemotherapeutic and surgical approaches using multimodal imaging.

2016/09/06
Publication on non-contact full-field optical coherence tomography for ophthalmology

Non-contact full-field optical coherence tomography: a step towards in vivo cellular-level imaging of the human cornea
Viacheslav Mazlin, Eugénie Dalimier, Kate Grieve, Kristina Irsch, José Sahel, Mathias Fink, Claude Boccara
Imaging Systems and Applications p. IM3F.3, Optical Society of America,

Abstract

We present a new full-field optical coherence tomography instrument capable of corneal imaging in air. Acquired images show the potential of this system for realization of in-vivo ultrahigh-resolution human cornea imaging.

2016/09/06
Publication on keratoconic cornea imaging in vivo and ex vivo

Imaging microscopic features of keratoconic corneal morphology
Kate Grieve, Cristina Georgeon, Felipe Andreiuolo, Marie Borderie, Djida Ghoubay, Josette Rault, Vincent M. Borderie
Cornea,

Abstract

Purpose: To search for gold-standard histology indicators using alternative imaging modalities in keratoconic corneas.

Methods: Prospective observational case-control study. Fourteen keratoconic corneas and 20 normal corneas (10 in vivo healthy subjects and 10 ex vivo donor corneas) were examined. Images of corneas were taken by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) before keratoplasty. The same removed corneal buttons were imaged after keratoplasty with full-field optical coherence microscopy (FFOCM) and then fixed and sent for histology. Controls consisted of normal subjects imaged in vivo with IVCM and donor corneas imaged ex vivo with FFOCM. Corneal structural changes related to pathology were noted with each imaging modality. Cell density was quantified by manual cell counting.

Results: Keratoconus indicators (ie, epithelial thinning/thickening, cell shape changes, ferritin deposits, basement membrane anomalies, Bowman layer thinning, ruptures, interruptions, scarring, stromal modifications, and appearance of Vogt striae) were generally visible with all modalities. Additional features could be seen with FFOCM in comparison with gold-standard histology, particularly in the Bowman layer region, whereas the combination of SD-OCT plus IVCM detected 76% of those features detected in histology. Three-dimensional FFOCM imaging aided interpretation of two-dimensional IVCM and SD-OCT data. Basal epithelial cell and keratocyte densities were significantly lower in patients with keratoconus than those in normals (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Structural and cellular assessment of the keratoconic cornea by means of either in vivo SD-OCT combined with IVCM or ex vivo FFOCM in both cross-sectional and en face views can detect as many keratoconus indicators as gold-standard histology.

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